Reviews tagged "totally awesome"

 

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

“Do you know why books such as this are so important? Because they have quality. And what does the word quality mean? To me it means texture. This book has pores. It has features. This book can go under the microscope. You’d find life under the glass, streaming past in infinite profusion. The more pores, […]

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The Once and Future King by T. H. White

“When I was a young man I did something which was not just, and from it has sprung the misery of my life. Do you think you can stop the consequences of a bad action, by doing good ones afterwards? I don’t. I have been trying to stopper it down with good actions, ever since, […]

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Passage by Connie Willis

“There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy.” So Hamlet says as he and Horatio face the ghost of Hamlet’s father. This line becomes the key phrase in Connie Willis’ incredible book Passage, which deals with multiple metaphysical themes in a manner both fascinating and simple. Death. […]

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Doomsday Book by Connie Willis

In this remarkable and moving book, Connie Willis describes two societies — our own modern world in the not-too-distant future, and the mediaeval world of the 14th century — as they respond to plague epidemics which threaten to destroy their very way of life. In the mid-21st century, time travel is the key to historians’ […]

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Declare by Tim Powers

When I started reading Declare, I was already a fan of Tim Powers and admired his books quite a lot. But I was absolutely blown away by the skill he shows in his latest book. It’s easily one of the ten best fantasy novels I’ve ever read; maybe one of the best five. The novel […]

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To Say Nothing of the Dog by Connie Willis

To Say Nothing of the Dog opens in the ruins of Coventry Cathedral, right after it’s been bombed in the blitz. The hero, a time-travelling historian called Ned Henry, is in an advanced state of time-lag because he’s been jumping back and forth to look for an atrocity of Victorian art called “the Bishop’s Bird […]

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The Space Trilogy by C. S. Lewis

Lewis is of course one of the greatest Christian authors and apologists of the twentieth century; it goes without saying that his works earn high moral recommendations. The Space Trilogy — Out of the Silent Planet, Perelandra, and That Hideous Strength — deserves every bit as much praise as any of his other fictional works. […]

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The Sword and the Circle by Rosemary Suttcliff

(This review also covers the two sequels, The Light Beyond the Forest and The Road to Camlann.) These retellings of the Matter of Britain stick closely to the traditional materials; Sutcliff’s source was Malory for the most part, and she deviates from him rarely if at all. The first book covers the prelude material, Arthur’s […]

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The Song of Albion by Stephen Lawhead

(Nota bene: These were some of the first fantasy books to capture my imagination, and three readings later, they’re still some of my very favorites. Proceed at your own risk. 🙂 ) Stephen Lawhead’s writing is in general quite satisfactory, but these books stand above all his others as a triumph in modern fantasy literature. […]

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The Chronicles of Prydain by Lloyd Alexander

C. S. Lewis once said that if a children’s book isn’t worth reading for adults, then it isn’t worth reading for children either, and his comment only makes sense. Why force children to read something that isn’t worthwhile for humans in general? Lloyd Alexander’s books are an excellent example of literature written for children yet […]

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